A posterior vaginal wall prolapse occurs when the thin wall of tissue that separates the rectum from the vagina weakens, allowing the vaginal wall to bulge. Posterior vaginal prolapse is also known as Rectocele. 

Childbirth and other processes that put pressure on pelvic tissues can lead to posterior vaginal prolapse. A small prolapse may cause no signs or symptoms. If a posterior vaginal prolapse is large, it may create a noticeable bulge of tissue through the vaginal opening. This bulge may be uncomfortable, but it's rarely painful. If needed, self-care measures and other nonsurgical options are often effective. Severe posterior vaginal prolapse might require surgical repair. 

symptoms of rectocele

A rectocele may cause no signs or symptoms. Otherwise, you may notice:

  • A soft bulge of tissue in your vagina that might protrude through the vaginal opening
  • Difficulty having a bowel movement
  • Sensation of rectal pressure or fullness
  • A feeling that the rectum has not completely emptied after a bowel movement
  • Sexual concerns, such as feeling embarrassed or sensing looseness in the tone of your vaginal tissue

Many women with posterior vaginal prolapse also experience pelvic organ prolapse. 

*This information does not replace a provider consultation. You should schedule an appointment with your provider if you experience any of these symptoms. 

*Information provided by the Mayo Clinic